Current Fellows

Nicol Mocchi

Fall 2019

Nicol Maria Mocchi is an Italian art historian specialized in modern and contemporary art. She obtained her PhD in 2014 from the University of Udine with a thesis entitled Fonti visive internazionali per gli artisti italiani negli anni del Simbolismo. Since 2010, she has collaborated with Milan’s Superintendence of Fine Arts and with the Archivio dell’Arte Metafisica. Most of her research has been devoted to Metaphysical Art, from its philosophical-cultural sources (latest essays appear in the exhibition catatalogue Préhistoire et Modernité, Paris 2019; De Chirico e Savinio, Parma 2019); to its national and international spread and reception (i.e. James T. Soby’s relationships to the de Chirico brothers, Studi OnLine, no. 9/10, 2018; Onslow-Ford’s show/lectures held in New York in 1941, Studi OnLine, no. 5/6, 2016). She is the author of La cultura dei fratelli de Chirico agli albori dell’arte metafisica (Milan 2017) based on an in-depth study of the books borrowed or consulted by the de Chirico brothers in the libraries of Milan and Florence between 1909 and 1911. Her other major research interests are the connections and exchanges between diverse visual cultures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with an emphasis on Austro-German, Anglo-American and Italian artists and movements. Her recent publications include essays on Symbolism, Divisionism, Futurism and Secessionist art (Prospettiva, 2018; Saggi e Memorie di Storia dell’Arte, 2018; Stati danimo, exh. cat. Ferrara 2018), on Morandi (New York New York, ex. cat. Milan 2017), and Boccioni (Umberto Boccioni, ex. cat. Milan/Rovereto 2016).

In 2016, she was a fellow at CIMA working on the reception, visual success and critical fortunes of Giorgio Morandi’s œuvre in the US, leading up to the 1950s.

Her current research project at CIMA will focus on the critical reception and visual impact of Marino Marini’s work on the U.S. art, exhibitory and commercial systems, over a period going from the mid-forties to the end of the sixties.

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Claudia Daniotti

Fall 2019

Claudia Daniotti is an art historian and researcher specializing in Italian Renaissance art, with an emphasis on iconography, the classical tradition and the transmission of visual motifs from antiquity to the present times. She holds a PhD from The Warburg Institute, University London, and a BA (Hons) and MA in History of Art from the Ca’ Foscari University, Venice. Her first monograph on the reception of the myth of Alexander the Great in Renaissance Italian art, based on her doctoral dissertation, will be published in 2020.

Since 2004, Claudia has been lecturing both in academia and museums, teaching across a range of areas and periods in Italian art history spanning from the fourteenth to the mid-twentieth century. She was a Visiting and Associated Lecturer in Renaissance and Baroque to Neoclassical Art at Buckingham and Bath Spa Universities (2016–2019), a Teaching Assistant at the Warburg Institute (2014), and worked for three years at the Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art as an Education and Exhibition Assistant (2008–2011). She is also an experienced tour guide, having led bespoke guided tours to museum permanent collections and temporary exhibitions for years, both in Italy and the UK. Claudia has published extensively in the fields of the classical tradition and fourteenth- to eighteenth-century art history, contributing essays, articles and catalogue entries to a number of edited volumes, journals, exhibition catalogues and conference proceedings. She is a founding member of the association and on-line journal Engramma. La tradizione classica nella memoria occidentale, on whose editorial board she sat until 2015.

During her fellowship at CIMA, Claudia will investigate Marino Marini’s sculpture in light of its appropriation and reinterpretation of models from antiquity, particularly from ancient Etruria and Egypt. Her research project aims to reassess Marini’s work within the context of the wider reception of those civilizations in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Italy, and in relation to the coeval changing perception of the ancient past and the Fascist redefinition of a new national identity.

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Erica Moretti

Travel Fellow - Summer 2019

Erica Moretti is an Assistant Professor of Italian at the Fashion Institute of Technology-SUNY. She received a Ph.D. in Italian Studies from Brown University and a diploma in American Studies from Smith College. Her research — rooted in biopolitics, gender and sexuality studies, and critical theory — focuses on pacifism, refugees and displacement, and humanitarianism in Modern Italy. With Sharon Wood, she published a collection of essays on British-Italian writer Annie Chartres Vivanti. She has published on assimilation policies in the United States in the Progressive era, the Italian feminist movement, and Italian colonialism, among other topics. She is currently working on a book project that explores changes in pacifist thought in the first half of the twentieth century in Europe through the work of Italian educator Maria Montessori.

For her CIMA travel fellowship, she will explore the revolution of child-centered and child-sized furniture in the school environment in turn-of-the-century Italy. The goal of this study is to understand how progressive design for children manifested itself through a unique blend of political, social, artistic and cultural forces. Together, these forces aimed at re-shaping the public sphere and re-thinking the notion of democratic and inclusive citizenry. She will conduct research at the Archivi delle Arti Applicate Italiane del XX Secolo, Archivio Randone, Archivio Cambellotti, and the Wolfson Collection in Rome, Bologna, and Genoa, focusing on the work of painter and potter Francesco Randone, founder of the Scuola d’Arte Educatrice; artist and designer Duilio Cambellotti; and pedagogue Alessandro Marcucci.

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Jennifer Scappettone

Affiliated Civitella Fellow - Summer 2019

Jennifer Scappettone is an Associate Professor of English, Romance languages and literatures, creative writing, and gender and sexuality studies at the University of Chicago, who works at the juncture of scholarly research, translation, and the literary arts, on the page and off. She is the author of Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice (Columbia University Press, 2014), a finalist for the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize, and her translations of the polyglot poet and refugee from Fascist Italy Amelia Rosselli were collected in Locomotrix (University of Chicago Press, 2012), which won the Academy of American Poets’s biennial Raiziss/De Palchi Prize. Scappettone curates PennSound Italiana, a sector of the audiovisual archive hosted by the University of Pennsylvania devoted to marginalized and experimental voices in Italian contemporary poetry

Scappettone’s recent writings can be found in journals such as alfabeta2, Asymptote, Boston Review, boundary2, Critical Inquiry, e-flux, Jacket2, Moderna, Modern Philology, Nuovi argomenti, and PMLA; in the collections Reading Experimental Writing (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), Geopoetics in Practice (Routledge, 2019), Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), Poetics and Precarity (SUNY Press, 2018), The Fate of Difficulty in the Poetry of Our Time (Northwestern University Press, 2017), Terrain Vague: The Interstitial as Site, Concept, Intervention (Routledge, 2013), and The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (Princeton University Press, 2012); and in the catalog for the US Pavilion of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, Dimensions of Citizenship. She has also published several chapbooks and two full-length books of poetry: From Dame Quickly: Poems (Litmus Press, 2009) and The Republic of Exit 43: Outtakes & Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump (Atelos Press, 2016). Her work has been recognized by fellowships, residencies, and grants from foundations such as the Stanford Humanities Center, the Bogliasco Foundation, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, the Getty Research Institute, the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, and the Huntington Library, and she was a 2010-11 Rome Prize Fellow in Modern Italian Studies.

For her Affiliated CIMA – Civitella fellowship she will be working on a book manuscript devoted to the visual, spatial, and sonic transformations of verse by modernist and postwar poets such as Emilio Villa and Amelia Rosselli, whose expansions of poetic form in two and three dimensions carve out a space between national languages—reoccupying the utopian ideals of globality manifest in the futurist “wireless imagination” while deterritorializing both the poetry and the ideology of the patria.

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