Schifano and Celluloid: A Focus on Film and Photo

October 12 2021

Mario Schifano’s artistic practice extended well beyond the realm of painting. Indeed, many of his works on canvas are direct reflections and translations of a process that begins with photographs, film, and television. Professors Walter Guadagnini (Accademia di Belle Art di Bologna) and Giulia Simi (Università di Sassari) will discuss Schifano’s multifaceted work with CIMA Fellow Biancalucia Maglione.

Walter Guadagnini is an art critic and Professor of History of Photography at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Bologna, Italy. He has served as Director of the Galleria Civica di Modena, and currently serves as Director of CAMERA – Centro italiano per la fotografia. He is the author of numerous important books on the history of photography (La Fotografia, 4 vols., Skira, 2011-2014; Racconti dalla camera oscura, Skira, 2015) and has curated critically acclaimed exhibitions on Pop art, Andy Warhol, and on contemporary trends in photography, such as True Fictions: fotografia visionaria dagli anni settanta a oggi (Palazzo Magnani, Reggio Emilia, 2020).

Giulia Simi received her PhD at the University of Pisa and she is currently a Researcher in Cinema, Photography and Television at the Università degli Studi di Sassari, Italy. Her scholarly interests focus on the relationship between film and the visual arts, and particularly on experimental films and autobiographical narrations. She is the author of Corpi in rivolta: Maria Klonaris e Katerina Thomadaki tra cinema espanso e femminismo (ETS, 2020). She has curated the 2018 film survey Soggetti imprevisti: cinema e video di ricerca delle donne in Italia dagli anni ’60 a oggi at the Mostra del Nuovo Cinema di Pesaro, and co-curated the 2020 edition of FAScinA – Forum Annuale delle Studiose di Cinema dell’Audiovisivo. She’s the curator of Patrizia Vicinelli – in transito, a multifaceted project devoted to the Italian avant-garde poet, visual artist, performer (Bologna, Teatro Comunale and other places, Festival Archivio Aperto 2021).

Free online event. RSVP here.

The event is made possible thanks to a generous contribution from:

 

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Identities in Motion: Tracing Mediterranean Crossings from the Decolonization Era to Contemporary Migrations

September 23 2021

This roundtable discussion takes cue from Mario Schifano’s biographic experience: born in colonial Libya in 1934 , the artist and his family were displaced to the Cinecittà refugee camp during World War II. Movements across the Mediterranean such as the one that Schifano undertook—whether as a result of wartime resettlement or as part of the post-WW2 decolonization process—play a pivotal role in the construction of the modern Italian identity. Professors Pamela Ballinger (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Rhiannon Welch (Univ. of California, Berkeley) and Eleanor Paynter (Migrations Postdoctoral Fellow, Einaudi Center, Cornelly University) will join CIMA Research Fellow Aja Martin for a conversation on these subjects, which inform the art, literature, and cinema of the postwar era, and can provide useful insights in today’s migratory phenomena and negotiations of Italian identity.

In-person event. Proof of at least one Covid-19 vaccination (NYS Excelsior Pass, NYC Covid Safe app, or original vaccination card) and masking are mandatory. CIMA continues to enforce strict cleaning protocols, social distancing, and air filtering.

RSVP HERE

 

About the speakers:

(photo by Leisa Thompson)

Pamela Ballinger is Professor of History and the Fred Cuny Chair in the History of Human Rights in the Department of History at the University of Michigan. She holds degrees in Anthropology (B.A. Stanford University, M. Phil Cambridge University, M.A. Johns Hopkins University) and a joint Ph.D. in Anthropology and History (Johns Hopkins). She is the author of History in Exile: Memory and Identity at the Borders of the Balkans (Princeton University Press, 2003), La Memoria dell’Esilio (Veltro Editrice,  2010), and the World Refugees Made: Decolonization and the Foundation of Postwar Italy (Cornell University Press, 2020). She has published in a wide range of journals, including Austrian History Yearbook, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Contemporary European History, Current Anthropology, Journal of Contemporary History, Journal of Modern Italian Studies, Journal of Refugee Studies, Journal of Tourism History, and Past and Present. Her areas of expertise include human rights, forced migration, refugees, fascism, seaspace, and modern Mediterranean and Balkan history.

 

 

Eleanor Paynter studies displacement, asylum, and migrant testimony, focusing on Africa-Europe mobilities and the Black Mediterranean, and drawing on narrative and ethnographic methods. She is especially interested in race, borders, migrant rights, and colonial memory in the Italian context. Her current book project, Emergency in Transit, engages oral, written, filmic, and visual witnessing forms to discuss the complex dynamics shaping Italy’s recent immigration “crises”. Her writing can be found in academic journals such as the minnesota review andA/B: Auto/Biography studies, as well as in venues including Forced Migration Review, The New Humanitarian, and the LA Review of Books, and she hosts the Cornell podcast A World on the Move. She holds a PhD in Comparative Studies from the Ohio State University and is currently a postdoctoral associate with Cornell University’s Migrations initiative and the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies.

 

 

Rhiannon Noel Welch works on modern Italian literature, film, and critical theory. Her first book, Vital Subjects: Race and Biopolitics in Italy, reads a range of canonical and lesser-known texts through the lens of biopolitics in order to demonstrate how race and colonialism have long been central to Italian modernity and national culture, rather than a fascist aberration or a contemporary phenomenon resulting from immigration.

Her current book project, Crisis and the Aesthetics of Deceleration, examines recurring figures of deceleration, dilation, and/or slowness, in Italian literature and film in light of the numerous biopolitical crises plaguing Italy and the world today (the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, mass migration, the failures of late capitalism, etc.).

Welch’s research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, the Mellon Foundation, the Cornell University Society for the Humanities, the Cornell University Institute of European Studies, and the Rutgers University School of Arts and Sciences. Before joining the faculty at Berkeley, Welch held positions at Cornell University, Franklin & Marshall College, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and Rutgers University.

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A Night among the Artists

September 18 2021

Let’s celebrate the artists in our community and their practice with a special evening tour, followed by a meet and greet with our Fall Research Fellows, Biancalucia Maglione and Aja Martin!

The event will start with a fellow-guided tour of our current exhibition, Facing America: Mario Schifano, 1960-1965. After the tour, artists in attendance will have an opportunity to network among each other and to chat with our Fellows about their artistic practice. As professional art historians with curatorial and gallery experience, the Fellows will be happy to learn more about the work, successes, challenges and statements of the artists in CIMA’s community and beyond!

Light refreshments will be served during the meet&greet.

RSVP HERE.

General Admission: $15

CIMA Members: Free

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Schifano and Friends: Fulvio Abbate

September 02 2021

 

Tune in on September 2nd at 12:00 pm for a Facebook premiere of another segment of our ongoing series, Schifano & Friends, with art critic and writer Fulvio Abbate in conversation with CIMA Fellow Carlotta Vacchelli.

This conversation and Q&A is part of a broader series titled Schifano and Friends, which explores the relationship and connections between Mario Schifano and the work of other American and Italian artists and intellectuals.

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Beyond the Canvas: Schifano and Cinema – Final Screening

Film screening

August 18 2021

From the Cedar Tavern to Piazza del Popolo, the Beat generation meets Rock ‘n’ Roll, and the avantgarde travels from New York to Rome and back. A videoart journey in the international Counterculture of the Sixties through the eyes of Mario Schifano.

On August 18, we will screen Schifano’s rare shorts Reflex (1964, 8 min) and Souvenir (1967, 11 min.). The screening is made possible thanks to a Cultural Loan from Rome’s Cineteca Nazionale.

CIMA Research Fellow Biancalucia Maglione will deliver a short introduction before the screening.

The event is free and open to the public. RSVP not necessary but strongly encouraged. It will help the staff at Elizabeth Street Garden set up adequate seating.

REGISTER HERE

In partnership with Elizabeth Street Garden.
For information about how you can help save Elizabeth Street Garden, visit www.elizabethstreetgarden.com.

Free public access to this event is made possible thanks to funding from:

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Interns Night at CIMA!

Exhibition tour and social gathering

August 12 2021

Let’s celebrate the end of Summer Internships across the 5 boroughs with a special evening event open to all interns of artistic and cultural institutions!

7:00 PM: Tour of CIMA’s exhibition, Facing America: Mario Schifano, 1960-1965

7:30-9:00 PM: Music, aperitivo, and conversation

This is an in-person event. CIMA maintains extra cleaning practices in place as well as air sanitization. Mask wearing remains mandatory for non-vaccinated individuals.

Limited capacity! RSVP here.

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Beyond the Canvas: Schifano and Cinema

Film screening

July 28 2021

From the Cedar Tavern to Piazza del Popolo, the Beat generation meets Rock ‘n’ Roll, and the avantgarde travels from New York to Rome and back. A videoart journey in the international Counterculture of the Sixties through the eyes of Mario Schifano.

CIMA Research Fellow Marica Antonucci will deliver a short introduction before the screening.

The event is free and open to the public. RSVP not necessary but strongly encouraged. It will help the staff at Elizabeth Street Garden set up adequate seating.

REGISTER HERE

In partnership with Elizabeth Street Garden.
For information about how you can help save Elizabeth Street Garden, visit www.elizabethstreetgarden.com.

Free public access to this event is made possible thanks to funding from:

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Student Night at CIMA!

Social gathering and exhibition tour

July 22 2021

Join fellow students from Columbia, Cooper Union, CUNY, NYU, Pace, Parsons, SUNY, SVA and more for a night of Italian art, music, and refreshments! We celebrate the end of Summer Session courses with a special evening event open to all university students in the city. Come join us for one of the guided tours at 7PM or 8PM, and meet like-minded art lovers from different colleges and universities!

This is an in-person event. CIMA maintains extra cleaning practices in place as well as air sanitization. Mask wearing remains mandatory for non vaccinated individuals.

Limited capacity! RSVP here!

 

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Schifano and Friends: Marina Sagona

July 02 2021

This conversation and Q&A is part of a broader series titled Schifano and Friends, which explores the relationship and connections between Mario Schifano and the work of other American and Italian artists and intellectuals.

Marina Sagona is an Italian and American artist living in New York City. She works in a variety of visual media, often around the concepts of control, sometimes collaborating with other artists. Sagona was born in Rome and first started her artistic career as an illustrator working in the publishing world. In Rome she was assistant to artist Mario Schifano. In 1995, Sagona moved to the United States and began to contribute regularly to The New Yorker and The New York Times. From 2006 to 2008 she directed the contemporary department of Fiac Foundation for Italian Art and Culture. In 2014, she co-curated the show Dante Ferretti: Design and Construction for the Cinema at MoMA. Sagona is the recipient of the 2017 Strategic 50 Award, the 2019 Domus Artist Residency and the 2021 Chiquita Room Residency.

Online event. REGISTER HERE.

Free public access to this event is made possible thanks to funding from:

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FRAMING WORDS & DRAWINGS

June 30 2021

This virtual roundtable, conceived as a series of four talks, gathers scholars and poets around Words&Drawings, a suite of 17 works on paper completed in 1964 by American poet Frank O’Hara and Italian painter Mario Schifano. Our goal is to frame this project within the coeval collaborations between Frank O’Hara and artists such as Larry Rivers, Grace Hartigan, Jasper Johns, Joe Brainard, Norman Bluhm, and Alfred Leslie. In addition, we will contextualize this series in the broader field of poet-painter collaborations in the late Fifties and early Sixties. 

Always held in private collection, the series Words&Drawings is visible in the US for the first time. It is currently on view at the Center for Italian Modern Art (CIMA) as part of the exhibition Facing America. Mario Schifano 1960-1965, curated by Dr. Francesco Guzzetti.

Click here to RSVP to the events. You will receive a confirmation email with the Zoom links to the four conversations and also a reminder before each event.

Program

June 17, 2021 – 12:00 pm (EST)

Collaborations Yesterday and Today. An Introduction to Words&Drawings.
Virginia Magnaghi, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa

Frank O’Hara’s European Collaborators.
Dr. Matthew Holman, UCL, London

“The poetic possibilities” of New Realism and Pop Art in the Transatlantic Circles of John Ashbery and Mario Schifano.
Professor Karin Roffman, Yale University, New Haven

June 24, 2021 – 12:00 pm (EST)

Why I am Not a Painter: Frank O’Hara and the Conundrum of Word and Image.

Professor Olivier Brossard, Université Gustave Eiffel, Champs-sur-Marne, and

Poet and Professor Ann Lauterbach, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

June 30, 2021 – 18:00 pm (EST)

Poets John Yau and Tony Towle in conversation

July 1, 2021 – 12:00 pm (EST)

Ron Padgett on Frank O’Hara, Joe Brainard and 1960s New York School Collaborations.

Professor Karin Roffman and Poet Ron Padgett in conversation

Invited speakers

Olivier Brossard is Associate Professor of American literature at Université Gustave Eiffel where he co-runs the Poets and Critics program: www.poetscritics.org. He co-founded the Double Change collective, an online magazine and reading series in Paris www.doublechange.org. Olivier Brossard is joca seria éditions American poetry series editor: his most recent translation is John Ashbery’s Self Portrait in a Convex Mirror, in collaboration with Pierre Alferi and Marc Chénetier (joca seria, 2020).

Matthew James Holman is a writer and critic who received his PhD in 2020 from University College London, where he also teaches. Matthew’s research focuses on the poet Frank O’Hara’s curatorial career, as well as the cultural Cold War and the relationship between language and art. He has received research fellowships at Yale University, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Terra Foundation for American Art in Giverny, and the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies in Berlin, where he was supported by a Leverhulme Trust Study Abroad Studentship. His art writing, often on the New York School, has appeared in Frieze, Burlington Contemporary, The Art Newspaper, The White Review, and Apollo. Matthew is currently a Teaching Fellow at Queen Mary University of London and The Slade School of Fine Art.

Ann Lauterbach is a poet and essayist born and grew up in New York City. She spent seven years in London, working as an editor at Thames and Hudson publishers, curator of readings at The Institute for Contemporary Arts, for Fabbri and Partners (Milan and London) and as Production Manager at the art publishers Petersburg Press. Returning to New York, she worked in various art galleries before becoming a full-time teacher. She is the recipient of Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellowships. The author of ten books of poetry, several collaborations with visual artists, and three books of essays, she is Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. 

Virginia Magnaghi is a PhD candidate in Art History at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, Italy, and a current Research Fellow at the Center for Italian Modern Art in New York. Her research at CIMA deals with the early figurative works of Mario Schifano, and with his connections to the New York scene of artists and poets during his stays in the US during the Sixties. For her PhD, she is studying the pictorial and literary representations of natural landscape during Fascism.

Ron Padgett is an American poet. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1942, he has lived mostly in New York City since 1960. Among his many honors are a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship, the American Academy of Arts and Letters poetry award, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the Poetry Society of America’s Frost Award, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The French government made him an Officer in the Order of Arts and Letters. Padgett’s How Long was Pulitzer Prize finalist in poetry and his Collected Poems won the Los Angeles Times Prize for the best poetry book of 2014 and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. For many years he taught poetry writing to children and edited books on that subject. He is also a translator of twentieth-century French poets Guillaume Apollinaire, Pierre Reverdy, Valery Larbaud, and Blaise Cendrars, and a co-translator of Chinese poet Yu Jian. Padgett’s own work has been translated into eighteen languages, with recent books in Portuguese, Spanish, French, Greek, Polish, and Italian (Non praticare il cannibalismo). In addition to his poetry, he is the author of biographies and memoirs of Joe Brainard, Ted Berrigan, and his father, as well as Motor Maids across the Continent, a novella. He has collaborated with artists such as Jim Dine, George Schneeman, Joe Brainard, Bertrand Dorny, Rory McEwen, and Alex Katz. Padgett’s most recent poetry collection is Big Cabin. Forthcoming in 2022 is one entitled Dot. He is currently writing a memoir of his life-long friend Dick Gallup, the poet. Seven of Padgett’s poems were used in Jim Jarmusch’s film, Paterson. For more information, go to www.ronpadgett.com.

Karin Roffman is Associate Director of Public Humanities and a Senior Lecturer in Humanities at Yale University.  She is the author of two books, most recently The Songs We Know Best: John Ashbery’s Early Life (FSG, 2017), which was named one of the 100 notable books for 2017 by the New York Times. She has published essays on poetry, music and art in Raritan, Evergreen, Artforum, Rain Taxi, Yale Review and others, and she was the PI for “John Ashbery’s Nest“ (2019) a digital humanities project on (http://vr.ashberyhouse.yale.edu/) at the Yale DHLab.

Tony Towle has been associated with the New York School of poetry since 1963, when he took workshops with Frank O’Hara and Kenneth Koch at the New School. Since then he has published thirteen books of poetry, most recently Noir, from Hanging Loose Press in 2017. He has also written Memoir 1960-63 (Faux Press, 2001), about his early years of becoming a poet in New York. From 1964 to 1982, he was secretary and adminstrative assistant at Tatyana Grosman’s Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), publisher of original prints by Jasper Johns, Barnett Newman, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Rauscenberg, Larry Rivers, Robert Motherwell, Lee Bontecou, James Rosenquist, and other notable artists. This past year, Vehicle Editions brought out My First Three Books, a combination of an interview with Towle about how his early books came into existence; poems from that period, with a CD of the poet reading them; and contemporaneous photographs, many from ULAE. Towle’s latest award was from the Foundation for Contemporary Art in 2015.

John Yau has published books of poetry, fiction, and criticism. His latest poetry publications include a book of poems, Further Adventures in Monochrome (Copper Canyon Press, 2012), and the chapbook, Egyptian Sonnets (Rain Taxi, 2012). His most recent monographs are Catherine Murphy (Rizzoli, 2016), the first book on the artist, and Richard Artschwager: Into the Desert (Black Dog Publishing, 2015). He has also written monographs on A. R. Penck, Jasper Johns, and Andy Warhol. In 1999, he started Black Square Editions, a small press devoted to poetry, fiction, translation, and criticism. He was the Arts Editor for the Brooklyn Rail(2007–2011) before he began writing regularly for Hyperallergic Weekend. He is a Professor of Critical Studies at Mason Gross School of the Arts (Rutgers University).

This series of events is conceived and organized by CIMA fellow Virginia Magnaghi, and is made possible thanks to generous funding from Christie’s Inc.

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